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Best Life: How to resign without burning bridges

Published: Jan. 6, 2022 at 6:54 AM CST
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ORLANDO, FLA. (Ivanhoe Newswire) – After more than a year of uncertainty involving COVID-19, people are feeling restless. Not to get back into the office, but to leave their jobs entirely.

A whopping 55% of Americans say they will look for a new job this year. But before you quit, there are ways to re-assess your current job to make it work for you, or to make sure you don’t burn bridges on your way out.

Should you stay or should you go?

Before you quit, try reassessing your duties and make it work for you. Expanding your responsibilities within the company can offer the growth you’re looking for without leaving.

“As an employer, you’re trying to constantly make sure that people are in the right position,” said E.B. Fisher the CEO of Eden Software & Solutions.

Something to consider if you’re learning new skills; stay put until you know them. Then, create a mission statement for yourself. Decide what you want out of your next job and don’t settle. Build a team that will help you through the process.

Career.com says don’t leave with a bang. Rage-quitting burns bridges in your field and could hurt your chances of landing your next job. Don’t tell co-workers, word will travel fast. Quit in-person to your direct supervisor and don’t insist on just giving two weeks.

“They wanna make sure it was a clean transition,” said Fisher.

And don’t be hurt if your boss lets you go sooner than expected.

“The psychology of it is once you give your resignation, you’re checking out,” said Fisher.

So, it’s important not to slack off in your last few weeks and make your exit interview count.

“Try to leave on a good ground because you never know when you’re gonna run across people again,” said Fisher.

A few more things, always ask for a reference letter before you leave, find out when you’ll receive your last check and if your benefits will have any gap. One final piece of advice, don’t trash talk your company while you’re leaving or when you start your new job.

Contributor(s) to this news report include: Danielle Gober, Producer; Robert Walko, Videographer and Editor.

Copyright 2022 WMC. All rights reserved.

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